The Open Helsinki Hack-at-home is back!

The City of Helsinki is looking for new ways to support the developers to utilize open data in order to create digital services for the citizens. Open Helsinki Hack at Home encourages developers to create useful applications focused on transparency of the city decision-making and enabling better feedback from the citizens to the civil servants. The relaunch of Open Helsinki is August 5th!

Today Helsinki is a city where knowledge, ideas and people move freely. Open democracy is present in every-day life of the citizens; for example, starting from the Constitution’s citizens’ initiative to events like Restaurant Day, Cleaning Day and Helsinki Block Parties. From open data perspective Helsinki is a forerunner at international level, for example the decision-making data is open for the citizen. This has been acknowledged last week when Helsinki Region Infoshare service received the European Prize for Innovation in Public Administration.

The program focuses on relevant themes for the active citizen. These themes emphasize the openness of the city decision-making and solutions that enable feedback between the citizens and the City of Helsinki. In addition, the program calls for applications that enable tourists to experience Helsinki in a unique way.

Open Helsinki Hack at Home is open to everyone interested in developing digital services for the City of Helsinki. Anyone can participate by bringing an idea to solve a challenge – or contributing personal skills for others to use. All applications created in the Open Helsinki Hack at Home program automatically participate in the Apps4Finland competition that offers cash prizes and visibility for good applications and their authors.

Open Helsinki Hack at Home  is produced in collaboration with the City of Helsinki, Apps4Finland and Forum Virium Helsinki.

To participate, please follow this link

Build your app for transparent city with Open Helsinki Hack at Home

The City of Helsinki is looking for new ways to support the developers to utilize open data in order to create digital services for the citizens. Open Helsinki Hack at Home program is launched on the 14 of June 2013, and it encourages developers to create useful applications. The underlying themes of the program are transparency of the city decision-making and enabling better feedback from the citizens to the civil servants.



The program focuses on relevant themes for the active citizen. These themes emphasize the openness of the city decision-making and solutions that enable feedback between the citizens and the City of Helsinki. In addition, the program calls for applications that enable tourists to experience Helsinki in a unique way.

Open Helsinki – Hack at Home program is open to everyone interested in developing digital services for the City of Helsinki. Anyone can participate by bringing an idea to solve a challenge – or contributing personal skills for others to use. All applications created in the Open Helsinki – Hack at Home program automatically participate in the Apps4Finland competition that offers cash prizes and visibility for good applications and their authors.

Register and submit your initial app idea before June 28th! at http://openhelsinki.hackathome.com/

For further information: [email protected]

Twitter: #OH-HAH

Open Cities App Challenge Jury

We are happy to announce the jury members that will select the best apps from the Open Cities App Challenge. Participants of the challenge can tab into the great Open Data resources made availabe by the Open Cites project including data from the cities of Amsterdam, Barcelona, Bologna, Berlin, Helsinki, London, Paris and Rome.

The Open Cities App Challenge is a free entry competiton, and a chance to create and make a mark within the city you live. Your app can be seen and used by millions of European citizens.

Developers can still submit their app now. Its easy!

1. Create your app using Open Data from one of the participating cities
2. Upload it to http://opencities.appcircus.com/
3. Hit Submit!

The winner will receive the Best Open Cities App and a prize of €3,000 in November in Barcelona. The Open Data App Challenge deadline is June 30th, 2012 September 15th, 2012 (extended!!).

And here’s the jury who will evaluate the apps submitted to the challenge:

Ushman Haque, Pachube

Usman Haque is the founder of Pachube (now known as Cosm.com), a real-time data infrastructure and community for the Internet of Things (acquired by LogMeIn Inc in 2011, where he currently leads the Urban Projects Division); and director of Haque Design + Research (www.haque.co.uk). Trained as an architect, he has created responsive environments, interactive installations, digital interface devices and dozens of mass-participation initiatives. His skills include the design and engineering of both physical spaces and the software and systems that bring them to life. He received the 2008 Design of the Year Award (interactive) from the Design Museum, UK, a 2009 World Technology Award (art), a Wellcome Trust Sciart Award, a grant from the Daniel Langlois Foundation for Art, Science and Technology, the Swiss Creation Prize, Belluard Bollwerk International, the Japan Media Arts Festival Excellence prize and the Asia Digital Art Award Grand Prize.

Francesca Bria, Imperial College London

Francesca Bria is currently a PhD Researcher and Teaching Associate at Imperial College London, in the digital economy laboratory. She is investigating issues ranging from social media platforms, identity systems and digital Cities. Francesca is a member of the Internet of Things Council and a policy advisor and expert for the Province of Rome and the European Commission on ICT, Future Internet and Smart Cities. She is a member of the Expert Group on Open Innovation of the European Commission and of the IOT-A (Internet of Things Architecture) stakeholder community. Francesca is a social scientist with an MSc in digital economy and innovation from the University College of London, Birkbeck and she is an advocate for open technology, digital commons and collaborative creativity.

Dr. Rufus Pollock, Open Knowledge Foundation

Dr. Rufus Pollock is co-Founder and Director of the Open Knowledge Foundation, a Shuttleworth Foundation Fellow, an Associate of the Centre for Intellectual Property and Information Law at the University of Cambridge and a fellow of the RSA. He has worked extensively as a scholar and developer on the social, legal and technological issues related to the creation and sharing of knowledge and acted as an official adviser on open data to several governments.

After graduating with a first in Mathematics (and a distinction in part III) from the University of Cambridge in 2004 he co-founded the Open Knowledge Foundation, a not-for-profit which works to promote open knowledge — any kind of information from sonnets to statistics, genes to geodata, that can be freely used, reused, and redistributed. In parallel with his activities at the OKF, he has also worked as an academic in economist: in 2008 he obtained a PhD in Economics from the University of Cambridge and from 2007 to 2010 he was the Mead Fellow in Economics at Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge. He remains an Associate of the Centre for Intellectual Property and Information Law at the University of Cambridge. Other activities include: co-founding the Open Rights Group in 2005 and serving on its board until 2008; serving as director of the UK branch of the Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure from 2004-2006 during the crucial vote on the software patents directive, and as policy adviser to Creative Commons UK from 2003-2007.

Martin Bryant, The Next Web

Martin Bryant is Managing Editor at The Next Web, a leading online publication covering Internet technology, business and culture. Martin has a particular interest in European startups, and spends much time travelling the continent to meet the people behind the technologies that will shape the future.

Dietmar Offenhuber, MIT

Dietmar Offenhuber is a research fellow in the Senseable City Lab at the Department for Urban Studies and Planning at MIT. He has backgrounds in architecture, urban studies and interactive media; his research interests include the representation and organization of urban infrastructures. Dietmar holds degrees from TU Vienna and the MIT Media Lab. He was key researcher in the Ars Electronica Futurelab and the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Media.Art.Research and Professor in the Interface Cultures program at the Art University Linz. His work has been shown, among other places, at ZKM Karlsruhe, Ars Electronica, the Sundance Film Festival, Secession Vienna, the Seoul International Media Art Biennale and Arte Contemporaneo, Madrid.

Build your Smart City yourself: Open Data is in your hands!

The Open Cities App Challenge is a free entry competiton, and your chance to create and make your mark within the city you live. Your app can be seen and used by millions of European citizens and the best bit is – it remains all yours!

Shape the future of your city today!
Everyday, governments and government agencies, publish more data on the Internet than anyone else – use their information for FREE!

Make money from your app idea!
The most successful online brands we know today are built on open source and are using some kind of open data. Recently, Twitter open sourced its MySQL secret sauce; while Foursquare changed Google Maps as its default location search to OpenStreetMap.

Enter the Open Cities App Challenge, it could be just the beginning.

The clock is ticking!  Submit your app now. Its easy!

1. Create your app using Open Data
2. Upload it to http://opencities.appcircus.com/
3. Hit Submit!

The winner will receive the Best Open Cities App and a prize of €3,000 in November in Barcelona.

The Open Data App Challenge deadline is June 30th, 2012.

* The Open Data App Challenge powered by AppCircus is made possible by eight participating European cities including, Amsterdam, Barcelona, Bologna, Berlin, Helsinki, London, Paris and Rome.